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Catalog:

ROOM 12

FORMAT21 Photography Festival View 3D Gallery Visitor Feedback
Poster image for ROOM 12

Statement:

MacDonaldStrand, Zhao Qian, Jenny Matthews, Daniel Szalai, Bindi Vora, Philip Welding, Felipe Romero Beltr谩n, Hung Ching Yan

Magnum - Alessandra Sanguinetti, Mark Power, Peter Van Agtmael, Jim Goldberg & Cristina De Middel, Thomas Dworzak, Larry Towell, Carolyn Drake & Andres Gonzalez, Lua Ribeira, Matt Black, Antoine D鈥檃gata, Jerome Sessini, Olivia Arthur, Rafal Milach, Paolo Pellegrin, Yael Martinez

Curated by Peter Bonnell

Artworks in this room:

Room 12

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltran (Colombia/Spain)

An exploration of the arrest procedures of and violence against undocumented migrants in Spain. Photographs depict two migrants implementing the techniques of the Police Defence Manual to subdue one another. Alongside these images are archive files taken from the manual. This project examines what it means to reduce and subdue.

Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Reducci贸n

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Reducci贸n

Untitled (Rat with Wings) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)

Stadtluft compares Vienna鈥檚 2013 pigeon control programme with universal methods to oppress social groups, connecting the creation of human and nonhuman ontological differences in relation to the stigmatisation of communities through animalisation. Identifying the frameworks of segregation and hate speech, this project questions the role of bureaucracy and security policies as forms of social control.

Untitled (Rat with Wings) from the work Stadtluft

Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)

Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Stadtluft

Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)

A child under care

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)

The Song of a Young Nutter Hung Ching Yan presents weird and ridiculous childhood memories as visual metaphors in relation to the complex feelings of being an outsider in her own home country. This project uses the artist鈥檚 autobiographical humour to explore how a culture they consider controlling and conservative can shape character and values despite her nonconformity.

A child under care

Seven Patchwork Hangings Concerning Women and War

Jenny Matthews (UK)

A series of patchworks made during lockdown featuring images from the photographer鈥檚 archive from the last twenty years. Concerned with the effects of war on women's lives the making has been a slow process, in which to organise memories and contemplate the experiences witnessed from each country which range from war, rape and violence. The works are sewn together to create a series of patchworks honouring women and their lives, during and after conflict from all over the world.

Seven Patchwork Hangings Concerning Women and War

Palestine Quilt

Jenny Matthews (UK)
Palestine Quilt

Rwanda Quilt

Jenny Matthews (UK)
Rwanda Quilt

No More Flags

MacdonaldStrand (UK)

No More Flags is an ongoing project exhibited here as part of FORMAT Festival 2021. The work is made up of many heavily-altered photographs of extreme right-wing marches in the UK and USA. The flags have been crudely removed from the images to withdraw their asserted legitimacy and their implied message of being for the benefit of a national identity owned and defined by these groups. By taking the flags away we hope to start to disempower these groups of the symbols that they rely on to spread their message of hate and division. Please visit the FORMAT Festival website to read a short essay by Nicholas Mirzoeff: https://tinyurl.com/44t6kyud

No More Flags

MacdonaldStrand (UK)
https://www.macdonaldstrand.co.uk/

No More Flags

MacdonaldStrand (UK)

Untitled (Flak Tower) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)

Stadtluft compares Vienna鈥檚 2013 pigeon control programme with universal methods to oppress social groups, connecting the creation of human and nonhuman ontological differences in relation to the stigmatisation of communities through animalisation. Identifying the frameworks of segregation and hate speech, this project questions the role of bureaucracy and security policies as forms of social control.

Untitled (Flak Tower) from the work Stadtluft

Untitled (Burggarten) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Untitled (Burggarten) from the work Stadtluft

Untitled (Stadtpark) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Untitled (Stadtpark) from the work Stadtluft

Untitled (Volksgarten) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Untitled (Volksgarten) from the work Stadtluft

Untitled (Stadthalle) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Untitled (Stadthalle) from the work Stadtluft

Untitled (Schwedenplatz) from the work Stadtluft

Daniel Szalai (Hungary)
Untitled (Schwedenplatz) from the work Stadtluft

Mountain of Salt

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Mountain of Salt

spectators

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

spectators

LINEA:The Border Project

Magnum

Linea: The Border Project was created to go beyond the conventions of an often melodramatic news cycle and the relentless political posturing that has defined public understanding of the Mexico-USA border. We are interested in the subtlety, complexity, humanity and beauty of the region and its people. We made this work and this show to reflect these ideas, and will bring it to public spaces across both countries and the political divide inside the USA. In an era of of polarizing rhetoric and relentless attempts at dehumanizing the other, we hope our work can serve as a counterpoint and an antidote. In May 2019 Magnum photographers spent two weeks on either side of the US-Mexico border in San Diego, Tijuana, Juarez and El Paso. Many have returned to the region since and continue to document an ever-evolving story. ALESSANDRA SANGUINETTI JIM GOLDBERG & CRISTINA DE MIDDEL CAROLYN DRAKE & ANDRES GONZALEZ ANTOINE D鈥橝GATA RAFAL MILACH MARK POWER THOMAS DWORZAK LUA RIBEIRA JEROME SESSINI PAOLO PELLEGRIN PETER VAN AGTMAEL LARRY TOWELL MATT BLACK OLIVIA ARTHUR YAEL MARTINEZ

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)
Home Occupations

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)
Home Occupations

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)
Home Occupations

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)
Home Occupations

A Field Guide

Zhao Qian (China)

An exploration of spatial and cultural displacement using the long-haul airplane flight as a metaphor. Scale shifts, juxtaposition and aggressive colours translate the montage strategies of surrealism and postmodernism into the digital present. Zhao Qian maps the flatness of screen culture onto the dimensionality of an exhibition space, exploring contemporary image culture as our natural environment.

zhaoqian.co

Superspreader

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Superspreader

I Will Try to Do Better

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

I Will Try to Do Better

Language is a Place of Struggle

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Language is a Place of Struggle

Declare Change. Work for Change. Become the Change.

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Declare Change. Work for Change. Become the Change.

The Mind Games

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

The Mind Games

Daring Operation

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Daring Operation

Fighting Erasure

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Fighting Erasure

Minimise the Spread

Bindi Vora (UK)

Mountain of Salt (2020) is an ongoing series comprised found images, appropriated text and digital shape collages, initially conceptualised as a human response to the unfolding of covid-19. Since the pandemic gripped the world, I like many others became acutely aware of the landscape in which we are living in, where everything has felt amplified; clinging to the news for updates, statistics and curves and in our own ways analysing the myriad forms of information being shared with us. It highlights the way words and speech have a physical presence, a bearing upon us and carry weight. This text-based series of collages focuses on the provocative language used since March and evolved from the collecting words and sentences derived from politicians, journalists and individuals all sharing their commentary, updates or thoughts. The distinct rhetoric of collective responsibility, togetherness and unity constantly being consumed by us is further amplified by the shapes that appear in the works and reflects a semantic response to this. They aren鈥檛 only there to direct your gaze but reflect on the etymological meaning of what the shapes represent. The works have continued to evolve and now encompass issues and moments that have affected us well beyond the virus 鈥 conversations around oppression, racism and witnessing trauma but also speak to some of the more light-hearted moments in these times where we take solace. This curious collection of phrases speaks to the dissemination of language and its affect upon us. Mountain of Salt now encompasses more than 349 works.

Minimise the Spread

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)

鈥楬ome Occupations鈥 is about working from home. Featuring a coming together of self-portraiture and sculpture, this is a performative project played out in real time (and alongside my real job). In fact, if you are looking at this during the festival, I am working on it right now; logged on, wearing slippers, drinking coffee. It will evolve throughout the festival as my relationship with my environment unfolds. Photographs, video and text are being added to the exhibition at regular intervals, functioning like updates on my progress or lack thereof. Working from home changes our relationship with the objects we own and the domestic spaces we inhabit. It results in inhabiting two personas; worker and homeowner. There is a contrast between the intangibility of virtual meetings and being surrounded by tangible household objects. They are present whilst I work, they distract me from work. Often, they serve as a reminder of something that needs doing. That shelf needs fixing. The lawn needs mowing. Other times, they are a welcome distraction from the work contained on the screen. The boundaries of the work/life balance become eroded when the dog can join my meeting. The term Home Occupations has a dual meaning. In the US, zoning regulations have defined what is an acceptable 鈥榟ome occupation鈥, or, what can be lawfully carried out in residential dwellings, such as artist, dressmaker, author, clergyman. For me however, the title speaks of becoming occupied with the home, its contents and the permeable divide between work and life. I am on a Zoom call. My house plant is encroaching. I鈥檓 making a spreadsheet. I need to finish that tiling. I feed the dog whilst resolving a tricky work problem in my head. I climb the walls. Exercise at my desk. Workspace training for ergonomics at home. Prop my back with a cushion.

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)

Home Occupations

Philip Welding (UK)

Using vases to skip rope

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Using vases to skip rope

Eating dog treats on the ground of a beauty salon

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Eating dog treats on the ground of a beauty salon

Dad loves eating sticky rice dumplings wrapped with rocks

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Dad loves eating sticky rice dumplings wrapped with rocks

Chicken will appear when the egg paste flows down

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Chicken will appear when the egg paste flows down

A barefoot girl in stone sitting position

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
A barefoot girl in stone sitting position

Buying a new school uniform by tying my wrists with elastic bands

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Buying a new school uniform by tying my wrists with elastic bands

Fish is a terrible creature

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Fish is a terrible creature

I ate seaweed secretly by the bed

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
I ate seaweed secretly by the bed

I use fries to eat tomato sauce

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
I use fries to eat tomato sauce

Long hair is rolled into a machine

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Long hair is rolled into a machine

Miss Hong Kong is me

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Miss Hong Kong is me

Removing the pins and putting them in my mouth

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
Removing the pins and putting them in my mouth

The neighbor downstairs is cleaning in every second

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
The neighbor downstairs is cleaning in every second

You're like a cloud

Hung Ching Yan (Hong Kong)
You're like a cloud

Rwanda Zine

Jenny Matthews (UK)
Open PDF Viewer

Palestine Zine

Jenny Matthews (UK)
Open PDF Viewer

Iraq Zine

Jenny Matthews (UK)
Open PDF Viewer

Cheap Ocean

Zhao Qian (China)

A Field Guide is based on photographer Zhao Qian鈥檚 own experiences and imagination, providing a guide or map to the artist鈥檚 thoughts and ideas as he travels between two cities 鈥 San Francisco and Shanghai. But this guide is not intended to be an authoritative understanding of Zhao鈥檚 journey. There are no directions, names or definitions. The environments created are indicative of a cultural displacement Zhao experienced as he switched between the two countries. The specificity of national identity is elided in non-sites such as airports, where all design decisions鈥攆rom wayfinding signage to furniture to advertisements鈥攁re driven by maximum legibility and functionality. Within those levelling conditions, Zhao鈥檚 observational sensibility has the vibrancy and idiosyncrasy of a lucid dream. Scale shifts, odd juxtapositions, aggressive colours, and video sequences all contribute to an immersive effect that translates the montage strategies of surrealism and postmodernism into our fully digital present. Confronting the flattening tendencies of screen-culture鈥攊n which complex real-world objects, places, and emotions are dispersed into arrays of pixels鈥擹hao responds by mapping this flatness onto the dimensionality of a gallery or exhibition space. His open-ended Field Guide has infinite configurations. In that sense, it is not definitive in the traditional manner of the 鈥渇ield guide鈥 format, which is intended to help the reader to identify flora, fauna, or other things in their natural environment. Instead, Zhao Qian鈥檚 work makes us wonder if contemporary image culture is now in fact our natural environment. In that new reality, the artist鈥檚 roving attention is an invitation to us all to create our own field guides to our imaginations and creativity.

Cheap Ocean

Reducci贸n (Zine)

Felipe Romero Beltr谩n (Colombia/ Spain)
Open PDF Viewer

Magnum Borders